Archive | ETYMOLOGY RSS feed for this section
Georgium Sidus

Georgium Sidus

  Sir John Herschel The announcement last Friday of the death, at the age of 81, of the Rev. Sir John Herschel, Bart., which occurred at Observatory House, Slough, revives a host of memories of 18th century Bath. Sir John Herschel was the great-grandson of Sir William Herschel, the famous astronomer, who discovered from his […]

Continue Reading

marrowsky

    The noun marrowsky, which has also been spelt Marouski, Marowsky, morowski and mowrowsky, denotes a variety of slang, or a slip in speaking, characterised by the transposition of the initial letters or syllables of two words. The more usual term is spoonerism. The word is first recorded in the verbal form Marrowskying in the critical […]

Continue Reading

gossip

    MEANINGS   – a person who habitually talks about others, especially maliciously – a conversation involving malicious chatter or rumours about other people – casual and idle chat – light easy communication     ORIGIN   This word is from the Old English noun godsibb, composed of god and the adjective sib(b), meaning […]

Continue Reading
Joe Bloggs

Joe Bloggs

  Steve Cooper, playing Joe Bloggs in Monopoleyes, a play written by Will Travis, directed by Susan Mcardle and Paul Brannigan, and produced by Stolen Thread Productions Ltd, was interviewed on 25th October 2016: “You play Joe Bloggs – could you tell us a bit about your character and what your thoughts are on it?” […]

Continue Reading
bag of mystery

bag of mystery

Roast Donkey!—Everybody who has eaten roast donkey has pronounced it excellent (says a writer in Macmillan’s Magazine for October). In flavour it is said to resemble turkey, though the colour is considerably darker. The accomplished gourmet is aware what animal it is that contributes most largely to the composition of the best sausages in the […]

Continue Reading
money for old rope

money for old rope

  Money for Old Rope SACKING, RAGS, OLD CAR BATTERIES SCRAP & SALVAGE Our Lorry Will Collect It Cash Waiting Grantham Salvage Co. INNER STREET. Phone 1332 advertisement published in The Grantham Journal (Lincolnshire) on 15th July 1949     The phrase money for old rope has various meanings: a profitable return for little or no trouble; a very […]

Continue Reading
the penny dropped

the penny dropped

    The British phrase the penny dropped is used to indicate that someone has finally understood or realised something. It was originally used with allusion to the mechanism of a penny-in-the-slot machine. The following, from The Leeds Mercury (Yorkshire) of 30th August 1911, evokes this mechanism: PAPER PENNIES. OTLEY LAD’S PRANK WITH AUTOMATIC MACHINE. […]

Continue Reading
spoonerism

spoonerism

  photograph of William Archibald Spooner in The Leeds Mercury (Yorkshire) of Monday 1st September 1930   There is a rather awkward moment in “An Italian Straw Hat” when Laurence Payne, as a young bridegroom, looking desperately into the auditorium of the Old Vic, cries: “The thick plottens!” Hearing this elementary Spoonerism, graver members of the audience at the […]

Continue Reading
blarney

blarney

    As a noun, blarney means amusing and harmless nonsense and talk which aims to charm, flatter or persuade; as a verb, it means to influence or persuade (someone) using charm and pleasant flattery. This word is from Blarney, the name of a village near Cork in Ireland; in the castle there, is an […]

Continue Reading
to get the bird

to get the bird

  detail from the frontispiece to The Life of an Actor (1825), by Pierce Egan     The phrase to get, or to give, the bird means to receive, or to show, derision, to be dismissed, or to dismiss. It originated in theatrical slang and referred to the ‘big bird’, that is, the goose, which […]

Continue Reading
12345...53

Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus