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Green, an unsettling colour

Green, an unsettling colour

      Verdigris is a bright bluish-green encrustation or patina formed on copper or brass by atmospheric oxidation, consisting of basic copper carbonate. The word verdigris is from Old French verte-gres, earlier vert de Grece, meaning green of Greece.     ETYMOLOGIES   The word green is etymologically related to the words grass and grow. And […]

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bacon

bacon

        Harengs et bacons Sont bonnes provisions. Dicton paysan   En Grande-Bretagne mais aussi en France, le bacon a longtemps constitué un aliment de base, le fait qu’il soit salé et fumé assurant sa conservation.     ÉTYMOLOGIE   Le mot anglais bacon (prononcé [ˈbeɪk(ə)n] dans cette langue) est attesté en français […]

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‘nice’

‘nice’

  It seems hardly possible to explain the modern sense of nice, which in the course of its history has traversed nearly the whole diatonic scale between “rotten” and “ripping.” In Middle English and Old French it means foolish. Cotgrave explains it by “lither, lazie, sloathful, idle; faint, slack; dull, simple,” and Shakespeare uses it […]

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Is French language misogynist?

  Vous pouvez lire l’article en français ici You can read the article in French here     Here are two pairs of English words and their French equivalents: 1. English son ↔ daughter             French fils ↔ fille 2. English boy ↔ girl                       French garçon ↔ fille The words fils and fille are from Latin filius, […]

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La langue française est-elle misogyne ?

La langue française est-elle misogyne ?

  You can read the article in English here Vous pouvez lire l’article en anglais ici     Considérons les termes français suivants, avec leurs équivalents anglais :  fils                   fille                    son          daughter garçon            fille         […]

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The veracious story of a worthy knight, called Sir Loin of Beef

The veracious story of a worthy knight, called Sir Loin of Beef

  At Astley Hall (Lancashire), you can still see this chair… … with the following explanation: Sirloin Chair – King James I reputedly knighted a loin of beef upon this chair at Hoghton Tower, Lancashire, in 1617. Se non è vero, è ben trovato. (Even if it is not true, it makes a good story.)     The […]

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