Tag Archives: grammar
motherese

motherese

  Elissa Lee Newport – image: The Franklin Institute       In social psychology and linguistics, motherese, or Motherese, denotes a simplified form of language used especially by mothers in speaking to babies and young children, characterised by repetition, simple sentence structure, limited vocabulary, onomatopoeia, and expressive intonation. This term is composed of the […]

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‘Noel’

      MEANINGS   – Noel, or Noël: Christmas, especially on Christmas cards and as a refrain in carols – noel, or noël: a Christmas carol     ORIGIN   This noun is from Anglo-Norman and Middle French forms such as Noël, Noel (modern French Noël), variants of forms such as Naël, Nael, first attested […]

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glamour

      MEANING   an attractive or exciting quality that makes certain people or things seem appealing     ORIGIN   It was originally a Scottish alteration of grammar. The noun grammar is from Old French forms such as gramaire (modern French grammaire), from Latin grammatica (ars), from Greek γραμματική (τέχνη) (= grammatike (tekhne)), […]

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thoughtlet

thoughtlet

  Robert Browning (circa 1888)       The noun thoughtlet, composed of the noun thought and the diminutive suffix -let (as in booklet), denotes a small or insignificant thought. Its first known user is the English poet Ebenezer Elliott (1781-1849) in Peter Faultless to his Brother Simon (1820): Is there a sage of titum-tumti […]

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nonplus

    MEANING   a state in which one is unable to proceed or decide; inability to say or do more; a state of perplexity or puzzlement     ORIGIN   From scholastic disputation, this noun is from Latin non plus, meaning not more, no further, composed of non, not, and plus, more. It is […]

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promenade concert

promenade concert

  the Proms (2015) – photograph: BBC       A promenade concert is a concert at which some of the audience stand rather than sit.   In French, promenade is attested in 1599 in the sense of a place for promenading, and in 1671 in that of a leisurely walk. With addition of the […]

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‘onyx’

‘onyx’

  photograph: Health This Year      MEANING   a semi-precious variety of agate with different colours in layers     ORIGIN   Via Anglo-Norman and Old French forms such as onix and onice (Modern French onyx), the English word is from Latin onyx/onych-. This Latin noun is from Greek ὄνυξ/ὀνυχ- (onux/onukh-), which literally meant […]

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preposterous

preposterous

  title page of The discouerie of witchcraft (1584)       MEANING   contrary to nature, reason, or sense; absurd; ridiculous     ORIGIN   The adjective preposterous is from Latin praeposterus, meaning reversed, inverted, perverted, distorted, absurd, etc. This Latin adjective is composed of the adverb prae, in front, before, and the adjective […]

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Sciapodes

Sciapodes

  a sciapod, from the Hereford Mappa Mundi (circa 1300)       The Sciapodes (or Monopods) were a mythical race of people supposed to have lived at the southern edge of the ancient Greek and Roman world, who each had a single leg ending in a foot of immense size with which they shaded […]

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boutique

boutique

  image: Salle 103 – Latin (Collège de Vinci – Belfort – France)         MEANINGS OF BOUTIQUE   a small shop selling fashionable clothes or accessories a business serving a sophisticated or specialised clientele     ORIGIN   In the second half of the 18th century, English borrowed the French noun boutique […]

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