Tag Archives: Greek
tennis

tennis

  Jeu de paume – France – 17th century     Paulme: feminine. The paulme of the hand; also, a ball; (and hence) also, Tennis (play;) also, the Palme tree. from A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues (1611), by Randle Cotgrave     Fourthly, the inside of the Uvea is black’d like the walls […]

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‘Temptation’ in the Lord’s Prayer

‘Temptation’ in the Lord’s Prayer

  Notre Dame du Port – Clermont Ferrand (France)     To this day I suckle at the Lord’s Prayer like a child, and as an old man eat and drink from it and never get my fill. Martin Luther - 1535     The Lord’s Prayer, le Notre-Père in French, is a central prayer in Christianity. The […]

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malaria

malaria

  Malaria remains one of the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a tremendous impact in the developing world. Theories on the cause and transmission of malaria have evolved over time, from Hippocrates’ theory of bad air in the 5th Century BC to our current understanding of plasmodial organisms as the […]

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Nostalgia is no longer what it used to be*

Nostalgia is no longer what it used to be*

  (* cf. La Nostalgie n’est plus ce qu’elle était, a 1993 book by French actress Simone Signoret.)        In Dissertatio medica De Nostalgia, Oder Heimwehe, composed in Latin and published in Basel in 1688 (1678?), a Swiss doctor, Johannes Hofer, identified and named a new disease, nostalgia:  The symptoms indicating the presence […]

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Green, an unsettling colour

Green, an unsettling colour

      Verdigris is a bright bluish-green encrustation or patina formed on copper or brass by atmospheric oxidation, consisting of basic copper carbonate. The word verdigris is from Old French verte-gres, earlier vert de Grece, meaning green of Greece.     ETYMOLOGIES   The word green is etymologically related to the words grass and grow. And […]

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‘nice’

‘nice’

  It seems hardly possible to explain the modern sense of nice, which in the course of its history has traversed nearly the whole diatonic scale between “rotten” and “ripping.” In Middle English and Old French it means foolish. Cotgrave explains it by “lither, lazie, sloathful, idle; faint, slack; dull, simple,” and Shakespeare uses it […]

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Is French language misogynist?

  Vous pouvez lire l’article en français ici You can read the article in French here     Here are two pairs of English words and their French equivalents: 1. English son ↔ daughter             French fils ↔ fille 2. English boy ↔ girl                       French garçon ↔ fille The words fils and fille are from Latin filius, […]

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