Tag Archives: Greek

sparrowgrass

    MEANING   asparagus     ORIGIN   The Latin noun asparagus is a borrowing from Greek ἀσπάραγος (= asparagos). The Medieval Latin form was often sparagus, whence English sperage (also sparage, after smallage, wild celery), which was the common name in the 16th and early 17th centuries. Meanwhile, the influence of herbalists and […]

Continue Reading

hapax legomenon

    MEANING   a word or word form which is recorded only once in a text, in the work of a particular author, or in a body of literature     ORIGIN   This term is from Hellenistic Greek ἅπαξ λεγόμενον (= hapax legomenon), meaning something that has been said once, composed of ancient […]

Continue Reading
doryphore

doryphore

  “Death to the Doryphores” is slogan of schoolchildren off for potato-bug catching. In France “doryphores” is nickname for food-grabbing Germans, who love potatoes. from Vichy vs. France, by Richard de Rochemont – magazine Life, 1st September 1941       The French noun doryphore denotes the Colorado beetle, a yellow-and-black beetle native to America, […]

Continue Reading
psychopomp

psychopomp

  Charon and Psyche (circa 1883), by John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908)       MEANING   the spiritual guide of a living person’s soul     ORIGIN   The noun psychopomp, also psychopompos, is from ancient Greek ψυχοπομπός (= psukhopompos), meaning conductor, or guide, of souls. This Greek noun is from ψυχή (= pshukhe), soul, […]

Continue Reading
panther

panther

  Bija, a two-year-old female black leopard – Picture: Barry Bland/Barcroft Media       MEANING   a leopard, especially a black one     ORIGIN   Via Latin panthera and Anglo-Norman and Old French forms derived from Latin such as panthere and pantere (Modern French panthère), the English noun panther is from ancient Greek […]

Continue Reading
galaxy

galaxy

  the Milky Way – photograph: Wikimedia Commons/Steve Jurvetson       The noun galaxy appeared in Middle English in the sense of the Milky Way, the diffuse band of light stretching across the night sky that consists of millions of faint stars, nebulae, etc., within our Galaxy. The first known user of this word […]

Continue Reading
squirrel

squirrel

  photograph: Peter Trimming       The noun squirrel, which appeared in Middle English in forms such as squyrel and squerell, is from Anglo-Norman and Old French forms such as escuirel and escureul (Modern French écureuil), from the unattested Late Latin scuriolus, diminutive of an unattested altered form of the Latin word sciurus (biologists have retained the […]

Continue Reading
on the horns of a dilemma

on the horns of a dilemma

  St Jerome in his study (1480), by Domenico Ghirlandaio         MEANING   faced with a decision involving equally unfavourable alternatives (also read Morton’s fork)     ORIGIN   In logic, the term dilemma denotes a form of argument forcing an opponent to choose either of two equally unfavourable alternatives. The Latin […]

Continue Reading
canopy

canopy

  Judith Beheading Holofernes (1598-99) by Caravaggio (1571-1610)       PRIMARY MEANING   an ornamental cloth covering hung or held up over something, especially a throne or bed     ORIGIN   Via French canapé and Medieval Latin canopeum, English canopy is from classical Latin conopeum, conopium, denoting a net of fine gauze, used […]

Continue Reading

plagiary

      MEANING   (archaic) a person who plagiarises or a piece of plagiarism     ORIGIN   This word is from the Latin noun plagiarius, meaning a person who abducts the slaves of another and/or who buys or sells a free person as a slave. The Roman epigrammatist Martial (Marcus Valerius Martialis – […]

Continue Reading
12345...11

Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus