Tag Archives: Latin

paraphernalia

    MEANING   miscellaneous articles or equipment     ORIGIN   This noun is from Medieval Latin paraphernalia, short for paraphernalia bona, meaning married woman’s property. This was a noun use of the neuter plural of the Medieval Latin adjective paraphernalis, based on Greek παράφερνα (= parapherna), neuter plural meaning goods which a bride […]

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to intensify

    MEANING   to render intense, to give intensity to     ORIGIN   The English poet, critic and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) coined this verb in Biographia Literaria; or, Biographical sketches of my literary life and opinions (1817): The true practical general law of association is this; that whatever makes certain parts […]

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witticism

    MEANING   a witty remark     ORIGIN   John Dryden (1631-1700), English poet, playwright and critic, coined witticism from the adjective witty on the pattern of criticism in The Authors Apology for Heroique Poetry; and Poetique Licence, an essay introducing The State of Innocence and Fall of Man (1677), an opera written […]

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‘wasp’

‘wasp’

  image from Le Corset à travers les âges (The Corset through the ages – 1893), written by Ernest Léoty and illustrated by Saint-Elme Gautier     MEANING   a social winged insect which has a narrow waist and a sting and is typically yellow with black stripes     ORIGIN   Of Germanic origin, the noun […]

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R.S.V.P.

R.S.V.P.

    R.S.V.P. is an initialism from French répondez s’il vous plaît (literally respond if you please), meaning please reply, used at the end of invitations to request a response. It first appeared in English in the early 19th century. For example, in Domestic Duties; or, Instructions to young married ladies, on the management of […]

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sparrowgrass

    MEANING   asparagus     ORIGIN   The Latin noun asparagus is a borrowing from Greek ἀσπάραγος (= asparagos). The Medieval Latin form was often sparagus, whence English sperage (also sparage, after smallage, wild celery), which was the common name in the 16th and early 17th centuries. Meanwhile, the influence of herbalists and […]

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caterpillar

    MEANING   the larva of a butterfly or moth     ORIGIN   First attested in the mid-15th century, the noun caterpillar is probably from catepeluse and variants, which were the Anglo-Norman forms of the Old French feminine noun chatepelose and variants, meaning literally hairy she-cat. In his textbook Lesclarcissement de la langue […]

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parvanimity

    MEANING   smallness of mind, meanness     ORIGIN   This noun is composed of Latin parv(i)-, combining form of parvus, meaning small, animus, meaning mind, and the suffix -ity, forming abstract nouns. The combining form parv(i)- was found in a few Latin words such as parvicollis, meaning short-necked. In English, it is found for […]

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to be part and parcel of

    MEANING   to be an essential feature or element of     ORIGIN   Derived from Anglo-Norman forms such as parcele and parcell and Old and Middle French parcelle, parcel has as primary meaning small part of a whole. This noun is from an unattested post-classical Latin particella, part, portion, alteration of classical Latin particula, […]

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pogue

    MEANING   a kiss     ORIGIN   This Irish English noun, which has also been spelt poge, poage and póg, is from Irish póg, meaning a kiss. In An Irish-English Dictionary (1864), Edward O’Reilly gave the following translations: – pog, substantive feminine, a kiss; Welsh, poc. – pogadh, substantive, kissing. – pogaim, […]

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