Tag Archives: festivities
gianduja

gianduja

  Gianduja e Giandujotto (1986), by the Italian artist Walther Jervolino (1944-2012)     The Italian noun gianduia (improperly gianduja) appeared in the 19th century to denote a soft confection made with chocolate and ground hazelnuts, first produced in Turin, the capital of Piedmont, a region in north-western Italy, in the foothills of the Alps. […]

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pigeon’s milk

pigeon’s milk

    The term pigeon’s milk, also pigeon milk, denotes an imaginary substance which, as a joke, a child or gullible person may be sent to buy. The English antiquary and topographer John Brand (1744-1806) recorded it in the appendix to Observations on popular antiquities: including the whole of Mr. Bourne’s Antiquitates vulgares, with addenda […]

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Walker

    MEANING   Walker, more fully Hookey (also Hooky) Walker, is an exclamation expressing incredulity. It was first recorded in Lexicon Balatronicum¹. A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence (1811): Hookee Walker. An expression signifying that the story is not true, or that the thing will not occur. (¹ balatronicum: from […]

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beanfeast – beano

beanfeast – beano

    MEANING   (British informal): a celebration, party or other enjoyable time     ORIGIN   A beanfeast was originally an annual dinner given by employers to employees. For instance, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Chronicle of July 1793 reported the following: Saturday July 13. A fire broke out in the rope and yarn […]

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odditorium

    MEANING   a shop or venue for the sale or display of oddities or oddments     ORIGIN   This humorous noun is composed of oddit-, as in oddity, and the suffix -orium, after auditorium and perhaps also after emporium, meaning a large retail store selling a wide variety of goods. It was mentioned […]

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contredanse

    MEANING   a courtly French version of the English country dance, originating in the 18th century and similar to the quadrille     ORIGIN   The English noun contredanse, or contredance, was borrowed from French contredanse, itself an alteration of English country dance. The English country dance was introduced into France during the […]

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Mothering Sunday

    The middle or fourth Sunday in Lent, mid-Lent Sunday, is also called Mothering Sunday. A Law Dictionary: or, the interpreter of Words and Terms, Used either in the Common Statute Laws Of that Part Of Great Britain, call’d England; and In Tenures and Jocular Customs (1708) thus explained the use of the term […]

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Shrove Tuesday – le Mardi gras

Shrove Tuesday – le Mardi gras

  le carnaval de la mi-carême, Nantes (France) – photograph: MaxPPP/France-Soir         Shrovetide is the period comprising Quinquagesima Sunday, or Shrove Sunday, and the two following days, Shrove Monday and Shrove Tuesday. It immediately precedes Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. (Quinquagesima is short for ecclesiastical Latin quinquagesima dies, fiftieth day, because, […]

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jeopardy

jeopardy

  Jeopardy. This word is supposed to be derived from ‘j’ai perdu’, or ‘jeu perdu’. Skinner and Junius. Hazard; danger; Peril. A word not now in use. A Dictionary of the English Language (1785 edition), by Samuel Johnson (1709-84) There are two errors: the noun jeopardy is not from French j’ai perdu (I have lost) or jeu perdu […]

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hobby

hobby

      According to one theory, the noun hobby, in its original sense of a small horse or pony, is from the French noun of same meaning formerly spelt hobin, obin, etc., now aubin. This theory says that this noun is from the French verb hober, to move, derived from the verb hobeler, to […]

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