Tag Archives: science
Geordie

Geordie

  A trainload of coal on the High Level Bridge in Newcastle photograph: Stephen Craven     Geordie was originally a Scots and northern-English pet form of the forename George. The Scots and northern-English diminutive suffix -die is a variant of -y added to words or curtailed forms of words ending in r, l, or n. […]

Continue Reading
‘geek’

‘geek’

  Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones in The Theory of Everything (2014) a British film directed by James Marsh and based on Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen, by Jane Wilde Hawking     The noun geek was originally a northern-English dialectal noun meaning a fool, a simpleton, one who is befooled or derided, […]

Continue Reading
nyctograph, typhlograph & noctograph

nyctograph, typhlograph & noctograph

  advertisement for ‘Wedgwood’s highly improved noctograph’ – circa 1842 The ‘noctograph’, originally patented in 1806 as a ‘Stylographic Writer’, was designed to help blind people write. The device used ‘carbonated paper’, made by soaking paper with printers’ ink. Once dried, the paper was fitted in the writing frame between two sheets of plain paper […]

Continue Reading
captcha

captcha

      A captcha or CAPTCHA is any of various authentication systems devised to enable a computer to distinguish human from computer input, typically in order to thwart spam or to prevent automated misuse of a web site. The word also denotes a manifestation of such a system, especially a string of distorted letters […]

Continue Reading
dandelion – pissenlit

dandelion – pissenlit

  the 1905 edition of Le Petit Larousse illustré, a French-language encyclopaedic dictionary published by the Éditions Larousse In 1890, Eugène Grasset (1845-1917) designed the image of la Semeuse (the Sower) blowing dandelion seeds, which accompanies the motto of the Éditions Larousse, Je sème à tout vent (I sow to the four winds).     The word dandelion is from French dent de lion, in Medieval […]

Continue Reading
cheese – fromage

cheese – fromage

  “Comment voulez-vous gouverner un pays qui a deux-cent quarante-six variétés de fromage ?” (“How can you govern a country which has two hundred and forty-six varieties of cheese?”) attributed to Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), French general and statesman, in Les mots du général de Gaulle (1962), by Ernest Mignon photograph: fémivin.com   The word cheese is from Old English cēse, cȳse, […]

Continue Reading
123

Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus